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Wednesday, 09 Dec 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Meet Rocky Linux: New RHEL Fork by the Original CentOS Creator itsfoss 09/12/2020 - 12:22pm
Story [FIX] No Sound Output From HDMI in External Monitor In Ubuntu trendoceangd 09/12/2020 - 11:59am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2020 - 11:47am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2020 - 10:12am
Story Souk - New Independent Flatpak App Store Coming to GNOME arindam1989 09/12/2020 - 9:56am
Story Make medit your next Linux terminal text editor Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2020 - 9:38am
Story How I use Stream Deck on Linux with open source tools Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2020 - 9:35am
Story CentOS Project shifts focus to CentOS Stream Rianne Schestowitz 7 09/12/2020 - 9:31am
Story Now and Then: What happened to DFileManager? Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2020 - 9:28am
Story Graphics: Intel Graphics Compiler (IGC), Radeon RX 6900 XT and Latest From Mike Blumenkrantz Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2020 - 7:59am

Meet Rocky Linux: New RHEL Fork by the Original CentOS Creator

Filed under
News

Rocky Linux is a community enterprise Operating System designed to be 100% bug-for-bug compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux now that CentOS has shifted direction.

[FIX] No Sound Output From HDMI in External Monitor In Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Yesterday I connected my laptop to the TV to watch Resident Evil Extinction. When I played the movie, the Audio was coming from the Laptop instead of the T.V.

After that, I have solved my issue with getting under the hood of setting and change the output source.

So, I thought you also face this kind of problem, why not make an article on this and solve our folk issues.

Today in Techrights

Filed under
News

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Souk - New Independent Flatpak App Store Coming to GNOME

Filed under
GNOME

Tired of gnome-software eating up your RAM, slowing your system? Souk - a new Flatpak app store that comes to the rescue.

Make medit your next Linux terminal text editor

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

There’s XEDIT, jEdit, NEdit, gedit, and, as it turns out, medit.

I had not heard about medit until I started searching for editors I hadn’t yet tried, but I’m glad to have discovered it. If you’re looking for a classic gedit experience (circa Gnome 2), then medit is, probably unintentionally, an excellent and modern approximation. It’s also got many additional features, such as the ability to write plugins in Python, Lua, or C, and a means to integrate even shell scripts into its menu system. All the other usual features are here, too—a tabbed interface, an on-demand shell, indentation management, syntax highlighting, and so on.

How I use Stream Deck on Linux with open source tools

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Most of us have gotten a lot more familiar with working from home this year. In my role as a developer advocate, this has meant a lot less travel and a lot more video work, including streaming on Twitch.

As I transitioned to working and streaming video from home in spring 2020, I decided to get a Stream Deck, but I wasn't exactly sure what I'd use it for.

The Stream Deck is a keypad that makes it easier to manage your video streaming. You can customize its buttons to do things like switching scenes, adjusting audio, inserting media, interacting with viewers, and much more. I got the 32-button version because that's all that was in stock anywhere when I bought it.

Now and Then: What happened to DFileManager?

Filed under
Development
Software

Back in January 2015 we carried a blog post about DFileManager noting it was a real gem of a file manager sporting a unique Cover Flow display, together with an accessible bookmark system and customizable thumbnail preview for media files, but absent from the standard Ubuntu repositories.

At the time of the article, we were mostly testing software using Ubuntu 15.04 systems. That distribution offered approximately 39,000 packages in its Universe repository, and around 8,500 packages in its main repository. Those numbers sound a lot. But there was a smorgasbord of open source applications, utilities, and libraries that didn’t have anyone generating an Ubuntu package. And more importantly, there were some real treasures missing from the repositories which could only be discovered by compiling source code. DFileManager was one such utility.

Graphics: Intel Graphics Compiler (IGC), Radeon RX 6900 XT and Latest From Mike Blumenkrantz

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The open-source Intel Graphics Compiler (IGC) that is currently used by their oneAPI Level Zero and OpenCL implementations but likely to see Intel driver Mesa usage in 2021 has a new feature dubbed "IMF LA" that aims to help with the performance and close the gap with Windows.

    Released today was IGC 1.0.5761. This routine update to the Intel Graphics Compiler has a number of low-level compiler additions and other changes as usual. All quite low level but then there was the mention of "IMF LA open-sourcing."

  • After the Radeon RX 6800 series launched just under a month ago, the flagship AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT is launching today. This is currently the most powerful RDNA 2 graphics card and should work under Linux with the open-source driver stack but the card is likely to be scarcer than even the RX 6800 series.

    The Radeon RX 6900 XT features 80 compute units, a boost frequency up to 2.25GHz, 80 ray accelerators, 5120 stream processors, 16GB of GDDR6 video memory, 128MB of Infinity Cache, and has a 300 Watt GPU power rating.

  • I keep saying this, but I feel like I’m progressively getting further away from the original goal of this blog, which was to talk about actual code that I’m writing and not just create great graphics memes. So today it’s once again a return to the roots and the code that I had intended to talk about yesterday.

    Gallium is a state tracker, and as part of this, it provides various features to make writing drivers easier. One of these features is that it rolls atomic counters into SSBOs, both in terms of the actual buffer resource and the changing of shader instructions to access atomic counters as though they’re uint32_t values at an offset in a buffer. On the surface, and for most drivers, this is great: the driver just has to implement handling for SSBOs, and then they get counters as a bonus.

    As always, however, for zink this is A Very Bad Thing.

FSF, FSFE and First Release of GNU Autoconf in 8 Years

Filed under
GNU
  • This installment is focused on the history of what has come to be the FSF's tech team. The FSF started in 1985, and this series of articles is by no means an attempt to create a comprehensive linear history. Instead, I spoke to some of the former and current FSF system administrators and asked them for memorable moments from their time working with the FSF. This article lays out those stories and moments in the history of the technical infrastructure of FSF in a very simplified order. The two following articles in this series will highlight key moments in free software licensing and campaigning.

  • In my last blogpost I wrote about how we created a Dutch video translation of the Public Money? Public Code! campaign video. Well, you can now watch it yourself, as it has been released! On the 25th of November we held our Netherlands online get-together in which we showed it as a sneak preview, before release. At this meeting Matthias also joined to congratulate us with the result and to thank us for our efforts. This was a welcome surprise. Our next online get-together will be held on the 23rd of December, feel free to join and have a chat.

  • We are pleased to announce stable release 2.70 of GNU Autoconf.
    
    This release includes eight years of development work since the
    previous release, 2.69.  Noteworthy changes include support for the
    2011 revisions of the C and C++ standards, support for reproducible
    builds, improved support for cross-compilation, improved compatibility
    with current compilers and shell utilities, more efficient generated
    shell code, and many bug fixes.  See below for a detailed list of
    changes since the previous version, 2.69, as summarized by the NEWS
    file.
    
    Unfortunately, we were not able to maintain perfect backward
    compatibility with existing Autoconf scripts.  Caution is advised when
    upgrading.  The list of changes, below, includes detailed explanations
    and advice for all of the compatibility problems we know about.
    
    
  • GNU Autoconf 2.70 is out. "Noteworthy changes include support for the 2011 revisions of the C and C++ standards, support for reproducible builds, improved support for cross-compilation, improved compatibility with current compilers and shell utilities, more efficient generated shell code, and many bug fixes." See this article for more information on what has been happening with Autoconf.

Open Hardware Leftovers

Filed under
Hardware
  • Huzzah! I recently received my Librem 5 (Evergreen) from Purism. The Librem 5 is a smartphone that runs an otherwise standard linux kernel. However, unlike Android which also relies on the linux kernel under the hood, the Librem 5 uses a GNU userspace, adapted for mobile. This makes it more akin to your typical laptop in some ways, although the form factor still resembles a modern smartphone (at least, mostly). Here are some preliminary thoughts about the phone and how it compares to Pine64’s Pinephone, which is another phone that uses neither Android nor iOS, and relies on a GNU / Linux based OS.

  • There were two reasons I decided the time was right to upgrade. First, my aging phone’s battery was toast – I often had to plug it in to charge multiple times each day. And second, it was reaching end of life. Today Google rolled out the final official OTA update for Pixel 2 phones, but my new phone should receive OS and security updates for the next three years.

  • Back in October RISC-V minded startup SiFive announced the HiFive Unmatched development board as the best RISC-V development board we've seen to date. But only having 8GB of RAM was one of the few critiques which the company is now addressing.

    The HiFive Unmatched as announced in October features the SiFive FU740 SoC with four U74-MC cores and one S7 embedded core. The board has a 32MB SPI flash chip, four USB 3.2 Gen 1 ports, one PCI Express x16 slot (at x8 speeds), one NVMe M.2 slot, microSD, and Gigabit Ethernet. The HiFive Unmatched $665 USD price point is much better than the earlier HiFive Unleashed board price.

  • Fragmentation is a massive problem in computer software development that has only gotten worse with mobile computers. By fragmentation I’m referring to incompatible platforms that require a developer to maintain separate forks of their code. Twenty years ago if you wanted to write software for an end user, you had to decide whether to support Windows, Macs or Linux. Each of those platforms required you to build, test, and maintain different forks of your software.

    Fast forward to today, and at a minimum a developer has to decide whether to develop a “mobile app” or a “desktop app” and depending on that choice, has to decide whether to support Android or iOS (and if they want to be fancy, all of the Android forks and different mobile-only Linux OSes), or Windows, MacOS and Linux, or potentially all of the above!

    Each platform means a separate fork, a separate set of libraries and in some cases means you have to develop your application in a completely different language with a completely different framework! Fragmentation means developers must divide their limited time and attention between different codebases and understand the nuances of each platform. Fragmentation wastes valuable developer time. Since so many of these applications are proprietary (especially true for mobile apps), developers also typically can’t rely on the community to step in and port and support their application on a different platform.

3 ways Kubernetes optimizes your IT budget

Filed under
Server

Businesses all over the world are facing extraordinary challenges, and adapting to new ways of work is essential to their survival and progress. The importance of IT workers and systems can't be overstated; with companies looking for innovative ways to adjust, often with reduced resources, automation is increasingly central to day-to-day operations.

Many of these companies have turned to Kubernetes to ensure their products and services provide the best possible experience to users. Kubernetes is a container orchestration tool developed by Google. It's been open source since 2014, and over the past few years, a lot of tech success stories (including Netflix and hugely popular online games) have been built on using its tools to coordinate applications.

Perl/Raku Programming

Filed under
Development
  • In Day 4 of the Advent of Code, we are checking the fields of the passports.

  • On Day 5, they gave a task to find a seat number in a place. We have a list of occupied seats in a special form.

  • We have to count how many times each letter enters in each group. Again, the original task is more storyline-type and you’d better read it in original.

  • Let’l look at Day 7 of this year’s Advent of Code. This day’s problem is about handling luggage at the airport.

  • Here is Day 8 of Advent of Code 2020. Today, we are building a program to read an execute programs in the assembly language. Well, a very limited assembly with only three opcodes and one register, accumulator.

  • Raku NativeCalls provide a way to interact with dynamic libraries that follow the C calling convention and are very useful for obtaining information from the operating system, such as memory usage.

Mind Mapping Software

Filed under
Software

This free mind mapping software is a promising app designed to help you quickly record ideas and show the relationships between them.

Over the years, the world of free software has offered no shortage of mind mapping apps. Unfortunately, almost all of them have been freemium – limited versions of commercial products. For a while, Calligra Suite included the promising Braindump, but it is no longer maintained, and always felt overly complicated. Because of these conditions, I was immediately drawn towards Minder, an app developed in the last few years that is released under version 3.0 of the GNU General Public License and that has yet to find a place in the repositories of most major distributions. From the screenshots, it looked like it might pass the major tests I look for in a mind mapping app – an interface that does not interfere with the rapid recording of ideas and enough formatting features to allow users to create more elaborate mind maps if desired. Immediately, I decided to find out if it lived up to appearances.

As you probably know, mind maps are a visual representation of the relationship between ideas. They are the direct opposite of the conventional linear outlines that are often taught in high school. Their main purpose is to record ideas as quickly as possible, with a minimum of judgment (that comes later). Advocates of mind maps use them for brainstorming, notetaking, summaries, and planning and generating ideas, either as individuals or in groups.

Producing a mind map is simple. Start with a topic in the middle of your page, whiteboard, or screen. As a related topic occurs to you, write it elsewhere on your working surface, with a connecting line to the topic. Ideas can also be branched off from related topics. All topics – or nodes, as mind mappers usually call them –should be a single word or phrase in order to conserve space, or possibly some simple logo. Dedicated mind mappers may also add their own visual code, writing important ideas in larger characters and color-coding related topics or the lines between them. When you are finished, if you are writing an outline, you might also cross out some branches or add numbers to put the branches in order.

Release of Kubernetes 1.20: and Istio 1.8.1

Filed under
Server
  • We’re pleased to announce the release of Kubernetes 1.20, our third and final release of 2020! This release consists of 42 enhancements: 11 enhancements have graduated to stable, 15 enhancements are moving to beta, and 16 enhancements are entering alpha.

    The 1.20 release cycle returned to its normal cadence of 11 weeks following the previous extended release cycle. This is one of the most feature dense releases in a while: the Kubernetes innovation cycle is still trending upward. This release has more alpha than stable enhancements, showing that there is still much to explore in the cloud native ecosystem.

  • This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.8.0 and Istio 1.8.1

Security Issues and Proprietary Software

Filed under
Security
  • Over 100 device models from GE Healthcare that are used primarily for radiological and imaging purposes in hospitals and other healthcare facilities can easily be compromised by hackers because of default support credentials that are publicly known but can't be changed easily by users. This insecure implementation of remote management functionality allows hackers to access sensitive data stored on the impacted devices as well as infect them with malicious code that would be very hard to detect.

    Healthcare organizations have increasingly been targeted by cybercriminals groups this year, particularly those distributing ransomware. Three US agencies—the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)—jointly issued an alert, warning that groups like TrickBot, Ryuk and Conti pose an imminent threat to US hospitals and healthcare providers. Vulnerabilities like the one found in GE Healthcare devices can enhance those attacks giving hackers access to critical devices that organizations can't afford to be offline.

  • A CISA alert is flagging a critical default credentials issue that affects 100+ types of devices found in hospitals, from MRI machines to surgical imaging.

    A pair of critical vulnerabilities have been discovered in dozens of GE Healthcare radiological devices popular in hospitals, which could allow an attacker to gain access to sensitive personal health information (PHI), alter data and even shut the machine’s availability down.

  • Fixing the critical vulnerability isn’t straightforward and comes with its own risks.

  • Norway-based Vivaldi Technologies has released a new version of its browser of the same name for the desktop user, with a number of new features.

  • Vegeris, a security engineer at Evolution Gaming, warned that a novel cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability at the ‘teams.microsoft.com’ domain could be abused to trigger a remote code execution flaw in the Microsoft Teams desktop application.

  • FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia wrote in a blog post that “based on my 25 years in cyber security and responding to incidents, I’ve concluded we are witnessing an attack by a nation with top-tier offensive capabilities.”

  • Cyber security vendor FireEye has a considerable amount of egg on its face after the tools used by its Red Team — an attack unit — have been stolen by a group that it claims is a "highly sophisticated state-sponsored adversary".

CRUX 3.6

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This page discusses the relevant changes introduced in CRUX 3.6. Everybody upgrading from the previous release is advised to carefully read the following notes.

Mozilla: MDN, Firefox Nightly, and Election Security

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • In our previous post — MDN Web Docs evolves! Lowdown on the upcoming new platform — we talked about many aspects of the new MDN Web Docs platform that we’re launching on December 14th. In this post, we’ll look at one aspect in more detail — how we are handling localization going forward. We’ll talk about how our thinking has changed since our previous post, and detail our updated course of action.

  • Every two years around this time, the US has an election and the rest of the world marvels and asks itself one question: What the heck is going on with US elections? I’m not talking about US politics here but about the voting systems (machines, paper, etc.) that people use to vote, which are bafflingly complex. While it’s true that American voting is a chaotic patchwork of different systems scattered across jurisdictions, running efficient secure elections is a genuinely hard problem. This is often surprising to people who are used to other systems that demand precise accounting such as banking/ATMs or large scale databases, but the truth is that voting is fundamentally different and much harder.

    In this series I’ll be going through a variety of different voting systems so you can see how this works in practice. This post provides a brief overview of the basic requirements for voting systems. We’ll go into more detail about the practical impact of these requirements as we examine each system.

IBM’s Red Hat Just Killed CentOS as we Know it

Filed under
News

CentOS is regarded as a stable, secure and free Linux distribution for servers. The stability part of it is being jeopardized thanks to the latest changes made to this project by IBM-owned Red Hat.

Top 10 Unix Based Operating Systems

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

If you are looking for the original calendar date that brought Unix to life, you won’t be able to pinpoint a specific year, month, day, hour, minute, and second. It is because not all great things that come to life can be put on a predictable scale. However, the history books that investigated the rise of Unix narrate its birth to be between the 1960s and the 1970s. AT&T’s Bell Labs are responsible for Unix’s development. Linux’s priceless design attributes continue to showcase their footprints in the currently modernized operating systems we use.

The first popular trait of the Unix philosophy, evident in the day to day interactions we have with our modernized operating systems, is the efficient use of small modular utilities. Your Linux terminal is the best-case scenario for this trait. The Linux terminal’s simplicity syncs well with the complex tasks it performs through pipes and other features. This non-graphical user interface can also extend to manage and launch powerful graphical programs you might have installed. It is the perfect operating system feature for heavy lifting tasks. Moreover, the Linux terminal also implements powerful shell scripts, which can help you run powerful complex tasks in the background.

Another feature we can mirror from Unix into an operating system like Linux is using a single file system. The single file system feature enables OS programs to have a common communication platform. It is a unique platform of communication for programs and hardware devices. Think of the single file system as a playground with different kids. This playground enables these kids to talk and understand each other and their different fun skill sets. Therefore, the playground manager will comprehend what is going on in the playground the same way you can understand what is happening on your OS each time you interact with different files and hardware devices. This concept is also applicable in the Windows OS use of drive letters to identify and interact with hard drive partitions. This use of drive letters is an inherited feature from DOS. The same inheritance concept is evident in other operating systems where a single file is part of a hierarchy file system tree that links with other files and directories.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Souk - New Independent Flatpak App Store Coming to GNOME

Tired of gnome-software eating up your RAM, slowing your system? Souk - a new Flatpak app store that comes to the rescue.

Make medit your next Linux terminal text editor

There’s XEDIT, jEdit, NEdit, gedit, and, as it turns out, medit. I had not heard about medit until I started searching for editors I hadn’t yet tried, but I’m glad to have discovered it. If you’re looking for a classic gedit experience (circa Gnome 2), then medit is, probably unintentionally, an excellent and modern approximation. It’s also got many additional features, such as the ability to write plugins in Python, Lua, or C, and a means to integrate even shell scripts into its menu system. All the other usual features are here, too—a tabbed interface, an on-demand shell, indentation management, syntax highlighting, and so on.

How I use Stream Deck on Linux with open source tools

Most of us have gotten a lot more familiar with working from home this year. In my role as a developer advocate, this has meant a lot less travel and a lot more video work, including streaming on Twitch. As I transitioned to working and streaming video from home in spring 2020, I decided to get a Stream Deck, but I wasn't exactly sure what I'd use it for. The Stream Deck is a keypad that makes it easier to manage your video streaming. You can customize its buttons to do things like switching scenes, adjusting audio, inserting media, interacting with viewers, and much more. I got the 32-button version because that's all that was in stock anywhere when I bought it.

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